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Creating a more sustainable world

At WildCare, we work to make sure all species can coexist— not just by treating sick or injured animals (nearly 4,000 of them a year), but also by teaching children and adults to understand and appreciate wildlife, by sharing knowledge and instructions on how to live peacefully with the animals among us and by advocating for better protection of wildlife and our remaining open spaces.

This integrated approach is essential to WildCare, and we address both the symptoms of human/wildlife interaction and their underlying causes. By doing so, we hope to create a more sustainable world for all.

Everyone wants to do the right thing for wildlife… WildCare is here to help! H2

Our Mission: WildCare delivers world-class medical care in our open admission wildlife hospital, together with exceptional environmental education, community engagement, and effective advocacy for the protection of wildlife and our shared habitat.

Our Vision: WildCare envisions a future in which humans are committed stewards of the natural world and transform conflict with wildlife into coexistence. This integrated approach is essential to WildCare, and we address both the symptoms of human/wildlife interaction and their underlying causes. By doing so, we hope to create a more sustainable world for all.

Helping You Live Well with Wildlife H3

In addition to operating our Wildlife Hospital, we also provide numerous other resources to the local and larger community. Our Living with Wildlife Hotline is available any time of day or night to help anyone deal safely with the wildlife they encounter. We’ve also been a leader in developing new and innovative ways to address problem wildlife issues humanely with our WildCare Solutions service.

Get involved with Wildcare H4

Our Volunteer Programs allow people a hands-on way to make a real difference to wildlife and to the environment. And when wildlife needs us to advocate on its behalf, we take a stand — and help you do so, too. All these activities help foster an understanding of and appreciation for wildlife in all people. Ours is a full cycle of programs all working together to make the world better for wildlife and for people.

Visit and Shop WildCare's Onsite Store! H5/H6

Looking for a unique wildlife-themed gift for that special someone? Visit WildCare's onsite store and choose from a marvelous collection of fun jewelry, figurines and finger puppets, T-shirts (for all ages), fleece jackets and more!

In the 1950’s Elizabeth Terwilliger, the daughter of a pineapple plantation doctor from Hawaii, a recent transplant to Marin County, a mother of two, and a nurse by training, began to do for her children what her mother had done for her. She took them outdoors to explore and discover the wonders of nature. She had developed a love for nature herself as a child, and she absolutely loved to share it with others, particularly with children. Mrs. T’s children invited their friends along on these adventures, and their parents eventually invited themselves in order to see what all the fuss was about. They discovered that Mrs. Terwilliger had a very special talent for educating children, and they set about creating the infrastructure to insure that as many children as possible could benefit form her unique approach to teaching about nature.

Mrs. T believed that children learn best using all of their senses.

That if they could just explore the natural world and discover its wonders with just the right amount of gentle guidance, children would gain an important sense of the majesty of the natural world, and of their own connection to, and responsibility for it. She and her friends began by working with the local schools to create opportunities for trips and in-class presentations. The demand quickly became so overwhelming that they had to train themselves and others to be volunteer nature guides so that every class that wanted to visit or do a field trip could participate. They eventually formed a nature guide organization. At the peak of their activity, there were over 75 Terwilliger Nature Guides leading groups on field trips at sites throughout Marin County, teaching children to love nature, because, as Mrs. T said, people take care of the things they love.

Learn more

In 1954, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in San Rafael determined to build a larger Parish Hall to better serve its growing membership. Rather than tear down the old Parish Hall, the church gave it to the San Rafael Optimists Club, who moved it to its present site, near what is now Albert Park in San Rafael. The Optimists Club leased the site, for $1 a year to a local group who wanted to establish a Junior Museum. Fashioned after similar Junior Museums that had sprung up in communities across the country during the 40’s and early 50’s, Marin’s Junior Museum provided educational opportunities for young people to learn about nature and animals through educational displays and activities at the museum. They also had an animal lending program through which teachers and families could check out an animal to care for and learn about.
Louise A. Boyd Natural Science Museum

The merger of the California Center for Wildlife and the Terwilliger Nature Education Center took place for a variety of reasons.

It was first contemplated because the two organizations were considering the same site, (the old Nike Missile Site near McGinness Park), as a future home. Prospective funders and local politicos suggested that the two get together and explore the possibilities. Add to the mix that the California Center for Wildlife was looking to re-invigorate its educational programs, and that both organizations would presumably achieve economies of scale by merger. Much effort was put into insuring that the integrity and the heart of each organization be retained, and that a Mission Statement and name and image be developed that truly conveyed the spirit and the purpose of this new organization.

Today WildCare is a leader in wildlife rehabilitation and nature education. Our Terwilliger nature education programs reach more than 40,000 Bay Area children and adults every year, and our wildlife hospital treats nearly 4,000 ill, injured and orphaned wild patients each year. Our Living with Wildlife hotline answers thousands of calls to help people through wildlife emergencies, and our WildCare Solutions service brings our expertise to homeowners’ properties to help control and eliminate nuisance animal problems throughout the Bay Area.

In the 1950’s Elizabeth Terwilliger, the daughter of a pineapple plantation doctor from Hawaii, a recent transplant to Marin County, a mother of two, and a nurse by training, began to do for her children what her mother had done for her. She took them outdoors to explore and discover the wonders of nature. She had developed a love for nature herself as a child, and she absolutely loved to share it with others, particularly with children. Mrs. T’s children invited their friends along on these adventures, and their parents eventually invited themselves in order to see what all the fuss was about. They discovered that Mrs. Terwilliger had a very special talent for educating children, and they set about creating the infrastructure to insure that as many children as possible could benefit form her unique approach to teaching about nature.

Mrs. T believed that children learn best using all of their senses.

That if they could just explore the natural world and discover its wonders with just the right amount of gentle guidance, children would gain an important sense of the majesty of the natural world, and of their own connection to, and responsibility for it. She and her friends began by working with the local schools to create opportunities for trips and in-class presentations. The demand quickly became so overwhelming that they had to train themselves and others to be volunteer nature guides so that every class that wanted to visit or do a field trip could participate. They eventually formed a nature guide organization. At the peak of their activity, there were over 75 Terwilliger Nature Guides leading groups on field trips at sites throughout Marin County, teaching children to love nature, because, as Mrs. T said, people take care of the things they love.

Learn more

In 1954, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in San Rafael determined to build a larger Parish Hall to better serve its growing membership. Rather than tear down the old Parish Hall, the church gave it to the San Rafael Optimists Club, who moved it to its present site, near what is now Albert Park in San Rafael. The Optimists Club leased the site, for $1 a year to a local group who wanted to establish a Junior Museum. Fashioned after similar Junior Museums that had sprung up in communities across the country during the 40’s and early 50’s, Marin’s Junior Museum provided educational opportunities for young people to learn about nature and animals through educational displays and activities at the museum. They also had an animal lending program through which teachers and families could check out an animal to care for and learn about.
Louise A. Boyd Natural Science Museum

The merger of the California Center for Wildlife and the Terwilliger Nature Education Center took place for a variety of reasons.

It was first contemplated because the two organizations were considering the same site, (the old Nike Missile Site near McGinness Park), as a future home. Prospective funders and local politicos suggested that the two get together and explore the possibilities. Add to the mix that the California Center for Wildlife was looking to re-invigorate its educational programs, and that both organizations would presumably achieve economies of scale by merger. Much effort was put into insuring that the integrity and the heart of each organization be retained, and that a Mission Statement and name and image be developed that truly conveyed the spirit and the purpose of this new organization.

Today WildCare is a leader in wildlife rehabilitation and nature education. Our Terwilliger nature education programs reach more than 40,000 Bay Area children and adults every year, and our wildlife hospital treats nearly 4,000 ill, injured and orphaned wild patients each year. Our Living with Wildlife hotline answers thousands of calls to help people through wildlife emergencies, and our WildCare Solutions service brings our expertise to homeowners’ properties to help control and eliminate nuisance animal problems throughout the Bay Area.

In the 1950’s Elizabeth Terwilliger, the daughter of a pineapple plantation doctor from Hawaii, a recent transplant to Marin County, a mother of two, and a nurse by training, began to do for her children what her mother had done for her. She took them outdoors to explore and discover the wonders of nature. She had developed a love for nature herself as a child, and she absolutely loved to share it with others, particularly with children. Mrs. T’s children invited their friends along on these adventures, and their parents eventually invited themselves in order to see what all the fuss was about. They discovered that Mrs. Terwilliger had a very special talent for educating children, and they set about creating the infrastructure to insure that as many children as possible could benefit form her unique approach to teaching about nature.

Mrs. T believed that children learn best using all of their senses.

That if they could just explore the natural world and discover its wonders with just the right amount of gentle guidance, children would gain an important sense of the majesty of the natural world, and of their own connection to, and responsibility for it. She and her friends began by working with the local schools to create opportunities for trips and in-class presentations. The demand quickly became so overwhelming that they had to train themselves and others to be volunteer nature guides so that every class that wanted to visit or do a field trip could participate. They eventually formed a nature guide organization. At the peak of their activity, there were over 75 Terwilliger Nature Guides leading groups on field trips at sites throughout Marin County, teaching children to love nature, because, as Mrs. T said, people take care of the things they love.

Learn more

In 1954, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in San Rafael determined to build a larger Parish Hall to better serve its growing membership. Rather than tear down the old Parish Hall, the church gave it to the San Rafael Optimists Club, who moved it to its present site, near what is now Albert Park in San Rafael. The Optimists Club leased the site, for $1 a year to a local group who wanted to establish a Junior Museum. Fashioned after similar Junior Museums that had sprung up in communities across the country during the 40’s and early 50’s, Marin’s Junior Museum provided educational opportunities for young people to learn about nature and animals through educational displays and activities at the museum. They also had an animal lending program through which teachers and families could check out an animal to care for and learn about.
Louise A. Boyd Natural Science Museum

The merger of the California Center for Wildlife and the Terwilliger Nature Education Center took place for a variety of reasons.

It was first contemplated because the two organizations were considering the same site, (the old Nike Missile Site near McGinness Park), as a future home. Prospective funders and local politicos suggested that the two get together and explore the possibilities. Add to the mix that the California Center for Wildlife was looking to re-invigorate its educational programs, and that both organizations would presumably achieve economies of scale by merger. Much effort was put into insuring that the integrity and the heart of each organization be retained, and that a Mission Statement and name and image be developed that truly conveyed the spirit and the purpose of this new organization.

Today WildCare is a leader in wildlife rehabilitation and nature education. Our Terwilliger nature education programs reach more than 40,000 Bay Area children and adults every year, and our wildlife hospital treats nearly 4,000 ill, injured and orphaned wild patients each year. Our Living with Wildlife hotline answers thousands of calls to help people through wildlife emergencies, and our WildCare Solutions service brings our expertise to homeowners’ properties to help control and eliminate nuisance animal problems throughout the Bay Area.

Creating a more sustainable world

At WildCare, we work to make sure all species can coexist— not just by treating sick or injured animals (nearly 4,000 of them a year), but also by teaching children and adults to understand and appreciate wildlife, by sharing knowledge and instructions on how to live peacefully with the animals among us and by advocating for better protection of wildlife and our remaining open spaces.

This integrated approach is essential to WildCare, and we address both the symptoms of human/wildlife interaction and their underlying causes. By doing so, we hope to create a more sustainable world for all.

Creating a more sustainable world

At WildCare, we work to make sure all species can coexist— not just by treating sick or injured animals (nearly 4,000 of them a year), but also by teaching children and adults to understand and appreciate wildlife, by sharing knowledge and instructions on how to live peacefully with the animals among us and by advocating for better protection of wildlife and our remaining open spaces.

This integrated approach is essential to WildCare, and we address both the symptoms of human/wildlife interaction and their underlying causes. By doing so, we hope to create a more sustainable world for all.

Example caption  goes here...

Creating a more sustainable world

At WildCare, we work to make sure all species can coexist— not just by treating sick or injured animals (nearly 4,000 of them a year), but also by teaching children and adults to understand and appreciate wildlife, by sharing knowledge and instructions on how to live peacefully with the animals among us and by advocating for better protection of wildlife and our remaining open spaces.

This integrated approach is essential to WildCare, and we address both the symptoms of human/wildlife interaction and their underlying causes. By doing so, we hope to create a more sustainable world for all.

Thank you to the many people who have reached out to us regarding the North Bay fires. As the fires continue to rage, WildCare has activated staff and volunteers where they are most needed to assist our partner organizations.

Our Wildlife Hospital just admitted 14 birds from International Bird Rescue (IBR) (two oystercatchers, three sandpipers, one rail, a pelican, a cormorant and six gulls). IBR’s wildlife hospital in Fairfield is being threatened by flames. We are standing by to admit additional patients from IBR and other organizations if needed. The shipment of wildlife patients from IBR included a hit-by-car squirrel, currently receiving oxygen in the Wildlife Hospital.

A team of WildCare staff has taken our Wildlife Emergency Van to provide assistance to the Milo Foundation to evacuate a domestic animal shelter in the path of the fires. The specialized animal-handling skills of WildCare staff are much in demand.

Although we hope it will not be necessary, WildCare’s own 2017 Fire/Evacuation Plan is ready to be implemented, including having carriers prepped for all of our wildlife patients and our Wildlife Ambassador Animals, and volunteers ready to transport as needed.

Help make our work possible!

WildCare cares for as many as 4,000 ill, injured and orphaned wild animals every year, and we teach over 35,000 children and adults every year.

We can't heal animals, educate the next generation or advocate for wildlife without your help!

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Our Mission & History

WildCare delivers world-class medical care in our open admission wildlife hospital, together with exceptional environmental education, community engagement, and effective advocacy for the protection of wildlife and our shared habitat.